Recently in my life


I haven’t posted anything here for a while: second year PhD syndrome has finally kicked in with a heavier work load. Hopefully this should ease a little towards and around easter. “But what am I doing”, I hear you cry?

I brief, I’ve been doing a lot of stuff on Ophthalmosaurus especially; visiting Peterborough Museum and extending my description etc. I’ve also looked at using morphometrics to quantify the disparity in this genus, Brachypterygius and others—I even have a poster on that to present today, although this is preliminary work.

Intraspecific variation of humeri in Upper Jurassic ichthyosaurs, including Ophthalmosaurus icenicus (red), Brachypterygius extremus (blue), Nannopterygius enthekiodon (green) and LEICT G1.2001.016 (pink).
Intraspecific variation of humeri in Upper Jurassic ichthyosaurs, including Ophthalmosaurus icenicus (red), Brachypterygius extremus (blue), Nannopterygius enthekiodon (green) and LEICT G1.2001.016 Ophthalmosaurus sp. (pink).

Elsewhere, my time has been taken up with completing my phylogeny character list and playing in several concerts. On this topic: I’m excited to say that I’ll be playing tuba in Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, the ‘Symphony of a Thousand‘, in two weeks, probably the largest piece I’ll ever play.

So this is a brief catch-up, just to let you know that I haven’t forgotten you. Plans are afoot and gaining momentum. Until next time.

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4 thoughts on “Recently in my life

  1. Ben

    Can you please elucidate on the parameters used in the poster? I’m intrigued by your reference to LEICT G1.2001.016 Ophthalmosaurus sp. Sounds exciting. A new species from the OC at last or is this from a different epoch?

    Your summary of last years developments was epic.

    regards

    Paul

    1. Certainly, you can see the poster I made up here: http://www.academia.edu/2962647/Intra-_and_interspecific_variation_in_Jurassic_ichthyosaurs

      This is only preliminary work, initially to learn the methods and the look at the variation in Ophthalmosaurus; there’s still quite a way to go. The figures are based on landmark morphometrics of humeri, as that’s what there are the most and best specimens of: six landmarks, 74 semi-landmarks. The distal facets are important, but were only described with semi landmarks because of the different homologies of the facets.

      The Ophthalmosaurus sp. was included in Fischer et al. (2012; download free here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0029234) and I saw it on my visit to Leicester last year. It’s from the Spilsby Sandstone Fm, Tithonian–Berriasian. Unfortunately there isn’t much of it, but it is distinctive.

      And thanks for the compliment, here’s hoping that this year will be as epic, or more so.

      1. Thanks Ben. I believe there is more variation yet in the femurs and proximal rear limb elements of O. icenicus.

        Paul

      2. Ben

        I’d just like to say how excellent your blog is. Congratulations and keep up the good work. From a personal point of view I’d be really interested in an article on welsh ichthyosaurs.

        All the best

        Nick

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